DACA / Dream Act

DACA (Dream Act)


In 2012, the Obama Administration issued an Executive order which is known today as DACA or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. This law allows children who came to the United States illegally to be allowed to remain in the country. The reason for this law was to prevent deportation of children who had already assimilated in american culture.
DACA  allows children who were brought illegally  to be able to continue to reside in the United States if they meet the following requirements. 

DACA Eligiblity:

-Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;
-Came to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday;
-Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;
-Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making your request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
-Had no lawful status on June 15, 2012;
-Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
-Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor,or three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

If you satisfy the requirement you can now apply with USCIS and receive DACA Status. With DACA you can now get a Legal Work Permit and can apply for a Social Security Card. DACA Status however is not forever, the recipient must renew their status and work permit every two years.

If you think you are eligible for DACA, please Contact Us so that you can speak with an Immigration attorney. The laws are always changing to be sure you speak with an experience Immigration attorney and staff.